Do Big Dogs Know to Be Gentle With Small Dogs?

Do Big Dogs Know to Be Gentle With Small Dogs?

As dog owners, we want our dogs to be able to get along with all other dogs. It makes being a dog owner easier, more fun, and less stressful. However, it’s easy to forget that just like humans, dogs have complicated emotions that are influenced by a wide variety of factors.

These factors decide how they behave around other dogs and people. Though it would be nice for dogs to automatically get along with all other dogs, that simply just isn’t always the case.

If you have a large or small dog and want to know if they will get along with dogs of other sizes, then you’re not alone. We’ll walk you through some of the problems that large dogs often have with small dogs, and how to solve them.

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Should You Be Worried About Your Large Dog Around Smaller Dogs?

As a general rule, you shouldn’t worry about your large dog around smaller dogs. In most cases, they will be gentle and avoid hurting the small dog.

There are, however, some exceptions to this rule. If your large dog has a history of aggression or violence towards other dogs, then you should take extra precautions when introducing them to a small dog. The same goes for if your large dog is particularly rough when playing with other dogs.

Should You Be Worried About Your Large Dog Around Smaller Dogs?

Why Should You Want Your Large Dog to Get Along With Small Dogs?

There are a few reasons you might want your large dog to get along with small dogs. The most common reason is that it simply makes life easier.

Why Should You Want Your Large Dog to Get Along With Small Dogs?

If you’re a dog owner, chances are you’ve had to miss out on activities or events because you couldn’t find someone to watch your dog. If your dog doesn’t get along with other dogs, then it can be hard to find a dog sitter or take them to doggy daycare.

Another reason you might want your large dog to get along with small dogs is that it’s better for their health. Dogs that socialize with other dogs have been shown to have lower levels of stress and anxiety.

This is especially true for large dogs. They are more likely to develop anxiety and stress-related disorders if they don’t have regular contact with other dogs.

What Problems Do Large Dogs Often Have With Small Dogs?

One of the biggest problems that large dogs have with small dogs is that they tend to be too rough when playing. This is often due to the fact that they simply don’t know their own strength.

As a result, it’s important to supervise playtime between your large dog and any small dogs. If you see that your large dog is getting too rough, then intervene and stop the play.

What Problems Do Large Dogs Often Have With Small Dogs?

Another problem that large dogs often have with small dogs is that they may try to herd them. This is a natural instinct for many dogs, especially those who were bred for herding livestock.

If your dog tries to herd a small dog, it’s important to stop them and correct their behavior. Herding can be very dangerous for small dogs, as they could easily get injured or even killed.

Reasons Large Dogs Get Aggressive With Small Dogs

There are a variety of reasons that your large dog might be acting this way around small dogs. Digging into this psychology is very important as it will help you find the right solution to the problem that you’re having.

Uncertainty

One of the most common reasons that large dogs get aggressive with small dogs is that they’re feeling uncertain or anxious. This is often due to a lack of socialization or experience.

Territorial

Another common reason that large dogs act aggressively towards small dogs is that they’re feeling territorial. This is most likely to happen if the large dog perceives the small dog as a threat to their home or family.

Possessiveness

Another possible reason for aggression is that the large dog is feeling possessive. This is most likely to happen if the large dog views the small dog as a resource, such as a toy or food.

Lack of Socialization

One of the main reasons that large dogs act aggressively towards small dogs is that they simply haven’t been properly socialized. Socialization is incredibly important for all dogs, but it’s especially important for large dogs.

This is because they need to learn how to interact with other dogs in a safe and appropriate way. Without socialization, they may not know how to properly interact with other dogs, which can lead to aggression.

Reasons Large Dogs Get Aggressive With Small Dogs

How Can You Help Your Large Dog Get Along With Small Dogs?

Now that you know why your dog might be acting like this, it’s time to get to work solving the problem! Here are some guidelines for you to follow.

How Can You Help Your Large Dog Get Along With Small Dogs?

First, make sure that you socialize your large dog from an early age. This means exposing them to as many different types of dogs as possible. This will help them learn how to interact with all different types of dogs, and should help prevent any problems from arising.

Another thing you can do is to make sure that you supervise all interactions between your large dog and any small dogs. This way, you can intervene if things start to get too rough.

Finally, make sure that you train your large dog not to herd or chase other dogs. This is an important safety measure, as it could prevent them from accidentally hurting a small dog.

How to Socialize Your Large Dog With Small Dogs

The best way to socialize your large dog with small dogs is to gradually introduce them to each other. This means starting with short, supervised meetings and gradually increasing the time and duration of the meetings.

It’s also important to make sure that the meetings are positive experiences for both dogs. This means using treats and positive reinforcement to help them associate each other with good things.

Let’s Recap

Now that you know how to solve any problems that arise between your large dog and another small dog, you can help your dog have more fun and be more comfortable in all situations. As a dog owner, you’ll also be relieved by any progress made on this issue!

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