6 Reasons Why Dogs Don’t Like Getting Their Nails Cut

Why Dogs Don't Like Getting Their Nails Cut

Do you have a dog who hates having its nails cut? If so, you’re not alone. Many dogs don’t enjoy the process of getting their nails trimmed. In fact, some will do anything to avoid it. But why is that? What makes trimming a dog’s nails so unpleasant for them? Here are 6 possible reasons:

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So, why don’t dogs like getting their nails cut?

Your dog hates being restrained

Your dog hates being restrained

Perhaps the most obvious reason why your dog doesn’t like getting its nails trimmed is because it doesn’t like being restrained. Most dogs don’t enjoy being held down, and will struggle to get free.

This is especially true if they’re not used to it. If you only trim your dog’s nails every few months, it’s likely that it will fight you each time.

The solution: If your dog struggles to stay still while you trim its nails, try getting it used to being restrained beforehand. Spend a few minutes each day holding it in your lap or on a table, without trimming its nails. This will help it get used to the sensation of being restrained, and make the nail-trimming process less stressful.

Sensitive paws

Sensitive paws

Another reason your dog might not enjoy getting his nails trimmed is that he doesn’t like having his paws handled. For some dogs, having their paws touched is downright unpleasant.

This is often the case with dogs who have had bad experiences with paw-related procedures in the past, such as having a foreign object (such as a tick) removed from their paw.

The solution: If your dog doesn’t like having his paws touched, try desensitizing him to it beforehand. Spend a few minutes each day massaging his paws. This will help him get used to the sensation of being handled, and make the nail-trimming process less stressful.

Unpleasant past experiences

If your dog has had bad experiences with nail trimming in the past, it's likely that he associates the experience with something negative. Perhaps he was restrained too tightly, or the clippers were too sharp and hurt him. The solution: If your dog has had bad experiences with nail trimming in the past, try to make the experience more positive for him. Use a restraint that is comfortable for him, and make sure to reward your dog with a lot of treats. This way you condition your dog's emotions for a better experience.

If your dog has had bad experiences with nail trimming in the past, it’s likely that he associates the experience with something negative. Perhaps he was restrained too tightly, or the clippers were too sharp and hurt him.

The solution: If your dog has had bad experiences with nail trimming in the past, try to make the experience more positive for him. Use a restraint that is comfortable for him, and make sure to reward your dog with a lot of treats. This way you condition your dog’s emotions for a better experience.

That terrible clipping noise

That terrible clipping noise

For some dogs, the sound of the nail clippers is enough to send them running for the hills. If your dog hates the sound of the clippers, it’s likely that he associates it with something negative, such as pain or restraint.

The solution: A possibility is to buy another clipper that makes less noise. But a better solution is to get your dog used to the sound of the clippers beforehand.

It's time-consuming

It's time-consuming

In addition to being held, your dog has to be patient while you trim each and every one of his nails. For some dogs, this is simply too much to ask. They would much rather be running around and playing than sitting still for a long period of time.

The solution: The best solution is to trim your dog’s nails in several short sessions throughout the week, rather than one long session. This way your dog won’t get too bored or restless, and the experience will be less stressful for him.

Your trimming your dog's nails wrong

Your trimming your dog's nails wrong

If you’re not trimming your dog’s nails properly, it’s no wonder he doesn’t enjoy the experience. If you’re not careful, you can easily cut your dog’s quick (the blood vessel in the nail), which is extremely painful for him.

The solution: Make sure you know how to properly trim your dog’s nails before you start. If you’re unsure, ask your veterinarian or a professional groomer to show you how. And if you do accidentally cut your dog’s quick, don’t panic! Apply pressure to the area with a clean cloth and baby powder to stop the bleeding, and give your dog a lot of treats. He’ll soon forget all about it.

Additional tips for clipping your dog’s nails

Now that you know some of the reasons why your dog might not enjoy getting his nails trimmed, here are a few additional tips to make the experience go more smoothly:

Final thoughts

Clipping your dog’s nails doesn’t have to be a stressful experience for either of you. By following these tips, you can help your dog learn to enjoy the process. And who knows? With enough patience and practice, he might even start looking forward to it!

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